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Publications

Filtering by Tag: Sachiko Ozawa

Exploring pathways for building trust in vaccination and strengthening health system resilience

Future Health Systems

Ozawa S, Paina L and Qiu M (2016) Exploring pathways for building trust in vaccination and strengthening health system resilience, BMC Health Services Research, 16:1867, DOI: 10.1186/s12913-016-1867-7

Trust is critical to generate and maintain demand for vaccines in low and middle income countries. However, there is little documentation on how health system insufficiencies affect trust in vaccination and the process of re-building trust once it has been compromised. We reflect on how disruptions to immunizations systems can affect trust in vaccination and can compromise vaccine utilization. We then explore key pathways for overcoming system vulnerabilities in order to restore trust, to strengthen the resilience of health systems and communities, and to promote vaccine utilization.

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Public trust and vaccine acceptance-international perspectives

Future Health Systems

Trust in vaccines and in the health system is an important element of public health programs that aim to deliver life-saving vaccines. Indeed, understanding the contributors and threats to trust is essential to explaining vaccine acceptance, particularly as they vary across epidemiologic conditions, specific vaccines and cultural and sociopolitical settings. Greater efforts to communicate the benefits and risks of vaccines and address issues with evidence-based information will help improve and sustain public trust in vaccines and health systems worldwide. Measuring and monitoring trust levels and focusing on deliberate efforts to build trust in vaccines are important steps to reducing vaccine confidence gaps when they occur.
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How do you measure trust in the health system? A systematic review of the literature

Future Health Systems

People's trust in the health system plays a role in explaining one's access to and utilization of medical care, adherence to medications, continuity of care, and even self-reported health status. Yet it is not easy to find trust measures and understand what they are measuring. A systematic review of scales and indices identified 45 measures of trust within the health system with an average of 12 questions each, which quantified levels of trust among various relationships across the health system.
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10 best resources on … mixed methods research in health systems

Future Health Systems

Mixed methods research has become increasingly popular in health systems. Qualitative approaches are often used to explain quantitative results and help to develop interventions or survey instruments. Mixed methods research is especially important in low- and middle-income country (LMIC) settings, where understanding social, economic and cultural contexts are essential to assess health systems performance. To provide researchers and programme managers with a guide to mixed methods research in health systems, we review the best resources with a focus on LMICs.
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Building Informed Trust: Injection Practices in Cambodia

Future Health Systems

Dr Sachiko Ozawa from JHSPH presents recent findings from a study on trust in health systems and injection rates in Cambodia to the Health System Reform in Asia conference in Hong Kong in December 2012. She notes that the average Cambodian receives six injections/year, and that trained medical practitioners often feel pressure to give shots and IVs as patients will often turn to informal providers if they don't.
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Villagers’ evaluation of a community-based health insurance scheme in Thmar Pouk, Cambodia

Future Health Systems

There is growing international evidence that the effectiveness of health services stems primarily from the extent to which the incentives facing providers and consumers are aligned with "better health" objectives. Efficiency in health service provision requires that providers and consumers have incentives to use healthcare resources in ways that generate the maximum health gains. Equity in at least one sense requires that consumers requiring the same care are treated equally, irrespective of their ability to pay. Efficiency in the use of health services requires that consumers are knowledgeable about the services on offer and which are most appropriate to their needs. Although these principles are enshrined in the design of every health system in the world, they have proven extremely difficult to apply in practice. Healthcare providers have financial obligations to their families as well as professional obligations to their patients. Health service consumers generally lack information about both their health and health services so that they under-consume or over-consume healthcare.
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