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Publications

Filtering by Tag: Olico Okui

Effect of a participatory multisectoral maternal and newborn intervention on maternal health service utilization and newborn care practices: a quasi-experimental study in three rural Ugandan districts

Future Health Systems

Ekirapa-Kiracho E, Kananura RM, Tetui M, Namazzi G, Mutebi A, George A, Paina L, Waiswa P, Bumba A, Mulekwa G, Nakiganda-Busiku D, Lyagoba M, Naiga H, Putan M, Kulwenza A, Ajeani J, Kakaire-Kirunda A, Makumbi F, Atuyambe L, Okui O and  Kiwanuka SN (2017) Effect of a participatory multisectoral maternal and newborn intervention on maternal health service utilization and newborn care practices: a quasi-experimental study in three rural Ugandan districts, Global Health Action, 10:sup4, 1363506, DOI: 10.1080/16549716.2017.1363506

The MANIFEST study in eastern Uganda employed a participatory multisectoral approach to reduce barriers to access to maternal and newborn care services. This study analyses the effect of the intervention on the utilization of maternal and newborn services and care practices.

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Stakeholder Analysis for a Maternal and Newborn Health Project in Eastern Uganda

Future Health Systems

Based on the realization that Uganda is not on track to achieving Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5, Makerere University School of Public Health in collaboration with other partners proposed to conduct two community based maternal/newborn care interventions aimed at increasing access to health facility care through transport vouchers and use of community health workers to promote ideal family care practices. Prior to the implementation, a stakeholder analysis was undertaken to assess and map stakeholders’ interests, influence/power and position in relation to the interventions; their views regarding the success and sustainability; and how this research can influence policy formulation in the country.
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Exploring new health markets: experiences from informal providers of transport for maternal health services in Eastern Uganda

Future Health Systems

Although a number of intermediate transport initiatives have been used in some developing countries, available evidence reveals a dearth of local knowledge on the effect of these rural informal transport mechanisms on access to maternal health care services, the cost of implementing such schemes and their scalability. This paper, attempts to provide insights into the functioning of the informal transport markets in facilitating access to maternal health care. It also demonstrates the role that higher institutions of learning can play in designing projects that can increase the utilization of maternal health services.
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Increasing access to institutional deliveries using demand and supply side incentives: early results from a quasi-experimental study

Future Health Systems

eographical inaccessibility, lack of transport, and financial burdens are some of the demand side constraints to maternal health services in Uganda, while supply side problems include poor quality services related to unmotivated health workers and inadequate supplies. Most public health interventions in Uganda have addressed only selected supply side issues, and universities have focused their efforts on providing maternal services at tertiary hospitals. To demonstrate how reforms at Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MakCHS) can lead to making systemic changes that can improve maternal health services, a demand and supply side strategy was developed by working with local communities and national stakeholders.
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Women’s Perceptions Of ANC And Delivery Care Services, A Community Perspective

Future Health Systems

To reduce maternal morbidity, mortality and improve neonatal health, government has focused on improving access and supply of maternal health services. Despite these efforts, maternal morbidity and mortality remain a major public health problem in Uganda. This study explores the factors and challenges experienced in utilizing ANC and choosing a delivery place in order to inform the implementation of a proposed intervention aimed at improving access to maternal delivery services.
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FHS Uganda Research Brief 1 - Women’s Perceptions of ANC and delivery care Services, a community perspective

Future Health Systems

This study explores the factors and challenges experienced in utilizing ante-natal care (ANC) and choosing a delivery place in order to inform the implementation of a proposed intervention aimed at improving access to maternal delivery services.
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Changes in utilization of health services among poor and rural residents in Uganda: are reforms benefitting the poor?

Future Health Systems

Uganda implemented health sector reforms to make services more accessible to the population. An assessment of the likely impact of these reforms is important for informing policy. This paper describes the changes in utilization of health services that occurred among the poor and those in rural areas between 2002/3 and 2005/6 and associated factors.
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Increasing access to quality health care for the poor: Community perceptions on quality care in Uganda

Future Health Systems

This paper examines the community’s perspectives and perceptions on quality of health care delivery in two Uganda districts. The paper addresses community concerns on service quality.
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Lack of effective communication between communities and hospitals in Uganda: a qualitative exploration of missing links

Future Health Systems

Community members are stakeholders in hospitals and have a right to participate in the improvement of quality of services rendered to them. Their views are important because they reflect the perspectives of the general public. This study explored how communities that live around hospitals pass on their views to and receive feedback from the hospitals' management and administration.
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